Home | Council Home | Search | Contacts | About US | Provide Feedback |
Loading
AdminWednesday June 28, 2017
Skip Navigation Links
Home
Activities and EventsExpand Activities and Events
AdvancementExpand Advancement
Calendar
Camping Corner
Commissioner ServiceExpand Commissioner Service
ContactsExpand Contacts
DistrictExpand District
EMail ListExpand EMail List
Journey to ExcellenceExpand Journey to Excellence
Navigator
Online Rechartering
Order of the ArrowExpand Order of the Arrow
Patch GalleryExpand Patch Gallery
Photo GalleryExpand Photo Gallery
ProgramsExpand Programs
RecruitingExpand Recruiting
Religious AwardsExpand Religious Awards
ResourcesExpand Resources
RoundtableExpand Roundtable
Scouter RecognitionExpand Scouter Recognition
Support ScoutingExpand Support Scouting
TrainingExpand Training
--- Useful Links ---
MyScouting.org
Change of Position Form
Council Event Signup
The Language of Scouting
TLAs Explained




Follow us on Facebook




Get your news via EMail

Join the Northern Lights District E mail list, click on the button below


Click here for our E mail Policy


merit badges
May 2011



Return to Navigator Articles List

Summer Fun in the Northern Lights District

The purpose of the Guide to Safe Scouting is to prepare members of the Boy Scouts of America to conduct Scouting activities in a safe and prudent manner.

The policies and guidelines have been established because of the real need to protect members from known hazards that have been identified through 100 years of experience. Limitations on certain activities should not be viewed as stumbling blocks; rather, policies and guidelines are best described as stepping stones toward safe and enjoyable adventures

Ideas for Summer

Packtime summertime Award

http://tinyurl.com/3ju6z8u

BSA Family Program Award

The BSA Family Award program offers activities to help strengthen all families, whether two-parent, single-parent, or nontraditional. This program helps families accomplish worthy goals while building and strengthening relationships among family members. All family members are encouraged 4 to participate and may earn the award. The BSA Family Activity Book (available at your local council service center) gives all the requirements as well as step-by-step instructions for earning the BSA Family Award

Ready and Prepared Award

The BSA Ready & Prepared Award was developed to encourage and reward Boy Scout troops, Varsity Scout teams, and Venturing crews that incorporate safe practices while enjoying challenging activities

Keep America Beautiful Award

 The Hometown U.S.A. Award is a joint program between Keep America Beautiful Inc. (KAB) and the Boy Scouts of America. It is designed to give recognition to the outstanding efforts of Scouts in their com­munities in regard to citizenship and environmental improvement

TRUST Award

In the years since Venturing started, the program has been defined by the activities Venturers do and a popular activity is service. Religious organi­zations charter the majority of Venturing crews. Following in the tradition of the Quartermaster, Ranger, and Quest awards, a similar, challenging award program has therefore been created for Venturing's religious life emphasis. The TRUST award is a unique opportunity for the youth of Venturing.

Sweet Sixteen for Safety

Few youth organizations encompass the breadth, volume and diversity of physical activity common to Scouting, and none enjoy a better safety record. The key to maintaining and improving this exemplary record is the conscientious and trained adult leader who is attentive to safety concerns.

As an aid in the continuing effort to protect participants in Scout activity, the BSA National Health & Safety Committee and the Council Services Division of the BSA National Council have developed the "Sweet Sixteen" of BSA safety procedures for physical activity. These 16 points, which embody good judgment and common sense, are applicable to all activities

 

I. QUALIFIED SUPERVISION

2. PHYSICAL FI1NESS

For youth participants in any strenuous activity, the supervisor should receive a complete health history from a health care professional, parent or guardian. Neither youth nor adults should participate in activ­ity for which they are unfit. To do so would place both the individual arid others at risk.

3. BUDDY SYSTEM

4. SAFE AREA OR COURSE

5. EQUIPMENT SELECTION AND MAINTENANCE

Equipment should be selected to suit the participant and the activity and to include appropriate safety and program features. The supervisor should check equipment to determine it is in good condition for the ac­tivity and properly maintained while in use.

6. PERSONAL SAFETY EQUIPMENT

The supervisor must ensure that every participant has and uses the appropriate personal safety equipment. I.E Skaters may need protective gear.

7. SAFETY PROCEDURES /POLICIES

For most activities there are common sense procedures and standards that can greatly reduce the risk. These should be known and appreciated by all participants, and the supervisor must ensure compliance.

8. SKILL LEVEL LIMITS

There is a minimum skill level requirement for every activity, and the supervisor must identify and recognize this skill level and be sure that none are put at risk by attempting activity beyond their ability. An example of skill levels in Scouting is the venerable "swim test" which defines conditions for safe swimming based on individual ability.

9. WEATHER CHECK

The risk factors in many outdoor activities vary with weather conditions. These vari­ables and the appropriate response should be understood and anticipated.

10. PLANNING

Safe activity follows a plan that has been developed by the experienced supervisor or other competent source. Good planning minimizes risks and anticipates contingencies that may require emergency response or a change of plan.

II. COMMUNICATIONS

The supervisor needs to be able to com­municate effectively with participants as needed during the activity. Emergency com­munications also need to be considered in advance for any foreseeable contingencies.

12. PERMIT AND NOTICES

BSA tour permits, council office registration, government or landowner authorization, and any similar formalities are the supervisor's responsibility when such are required

13. FIRST AID RESOURCES

The supervisor should determine what first aid supplies to include among activity equipment. The level of first aid training and skill appropriate for the activity should also be considered.

14. Follow APPLICABLE LAWS

15. CPR RESOURCE

16. DISCIPLINE

No supervisor is effective if they can't control the activity and the participants. In addition to these general rules, safety concerns in certain BSA activities, including most of the aquatics programs, have been specifically addressed in more detailed guidelines. All leaders should review and comply with such guidelines in the respective activities.